The 3000GT Engine Specs

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The 3000GT Engine Specs
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The Mitsubishi 3000GT, known as the GTO in Japan, was produced from 1991 until the 1999 model-year. During this time, the 3000GT was only offered in two engine selections. These two options were both 3-liter, double overhead cam (DOHC) V6 engines, the main difference being that one had two turbo chargers on it, and the other had no turbo.

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Base Model and SL

The 3-liter DOHC V6 was the base engine in every 3000GT built. The base model and the SL model of the 3000GT came with the same 3-liter DOHC, non-turbo engine. This engine was capable of producing 222 horsepower, 217 foot-pounds of torque and had a compression ratio of 10.0:1. This engine remained unchanged, power-wise, for the entire production life of the Mitsubishi 3000GT, from 1991 through 1999.

VR-4 1991 Through 1993

During the early years of the Mitsubishi 3000GT, 1991 through 1993, the VR-4 was powered by the 3-liter, DOHC V6 engine with two turbo chargers. The turbo chargers pushed the VR-4 engine up to 300 horsepower and 307 foot-pounds of torque. The compression was dropped to 8.0:1 to accommodate the addition of forced air. The power numbers of this engine remained only until the 1993 model-year.

VR-4 1994 Through 1999

In 1994, not only was the body of the Mitsubishi 3000GT redesigned, but the VR-4 engine was pushed even farther than it had been before. The horsepower was pushed up an additional 20 horsepower to 320. The torque was also bumped up to 315 foot-pounds. These increases were not due to any changes to the engine but through electronic tuning. The core 3-liter DOHC V6 was unchanged. This engine remained in the 3000GT VR-4 until it was removed from Mitsubishi's line-up in 1999.

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