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What Are the Fielding Positions in Rounders?

Updated April 17, 2017

Rounders is a game that closely resembles baseball. The equipment and team make-up are all nearly identical and, as such, the fielding positions for rounders are roughly the same as those in baseball. There are nine defensive players on the field at any given time, and those players are divided into service, base and field players.

Service Players

The two players responsible for ball service are the pitcher/server and the catcher. As with baseball, the catcher is responsible for guarding the plate. This position has a much larger area of play than in baseball and the catcher's box (which measures 8 by 4 meters) extends beyond home plate and into the playing field. Aside from a base runner, the catcher is the only player allowed to enter this area or any part of the field between home plate and the pitcher's stand. The pitcher must remain on the pitcher's stand while serving, but once the ball is in play he's able to leave the stand in order to field the ball.

Base Players

In rounders, aside from the catcher, there are only three base positions. These players are responsible for all plays that occur between the pitcher's stand and the outfield. Exactly where a player is located relative to the base is determined by his experience. As the official title of the position is base "minder," players who are less experienced will field their positions closer to the base (without standing directly on top of it) so as to better ensure that base runners are less likely to advance. More experienced players are able to field the ball at a farther distance from the base, which provides better infield coverage.

Field Players

The remaining four field positions are in the outfield. These positions are the left infield, left outfield, right infield and right outfield. Since second base minders generally field the ball to the left of the base (the first base side), a position that's lacking in rounders is a baseball shortstop. Shortstops are responsible for fielding the ball when it's hit between second and third. Without this fielding position, in rounders the player in the left infield is permitted to play forward enough to cover this position. The right infielder is also allowed to play near to the baseline should the base minders be required to stay close to their bases. Right and left outfielders can be played as far back as necessary (within the boundaries of the field dimensions) depending on a known batter's hitting ability.

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About the Author

Joanne Robitaille's first journalistic experience was in 1994, when she did school reports for a local newspaper, "Shoreline." Her articles now appear on various websites. Robitaille has a Bachelor of Arts in English and creative writing from the University of Windsor.