Labor laws pertaining to salaried employees clocking in & out

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Labor laws pertaining to salaried employees clocking in & out
Salaried supervisors that are not executives are protected by the Fair Labor Standards Act. (boss and secretary image by Valentin Mosichev from Fotolia.com)

Salaried employees are often required to clock in and out from work in compliance with federal and state labour laws. Non-exempt salaried employees such as supervisors are still eligible for the same labour protections as hourly wage earners and should remind any employer that attempts to subvert these rights of the stiff penalties involved in labour law infractions.

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Arrival Time

Employees are required to arrive on time for work regardless of being an hourly wage earner or having a salaried income. It is for this reason that salaried employees are asked to clock in and clock out of work to determine if they are getting to work on time, working for a full eight hours or what is considered a full work day and not abusing the privileges that come with being in a managerial or supervisory position.

Break Time

Salaried employees in some states are allowed to take a 30-minute meal break for every five hours of work just like hourly wage earners. According to the website for the California Department of Industrial relations, no employer may employ any worker for more than five hours without an uninterrupted 30-minute meal break. Employers are not required to schedule employees for a meal break if the total scheduled workday does not exceed six hours.

Overtime Pay

According to Anne Fischer, writing in 2007 for CNN Money, employers are required to pay overtime to non-exempt salaried workers in accordance with the federal Fair Labor Standards Act. Clocking in and out from work assists in determining if overtime needs to be paid to the employee. Overtime pay for salaried workers is calculated by dividing the yearly salary of the employee by 12 to find his monthly wage then breaking that number down to weekly pay and taking that number divided by 40 to determine the salaried employee's "hourly" pay rate. Overtime pay is paid at the employee's hourly wage plus one-half. For example if the salaried employee's hourly wage is found to be £13 per hour then his overtime pay will be £19 per hour beyond 40 hours worked per week.

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