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Miracle gro effects on humans

Miracle-Gro is a plant food that has become a staple for many residential and professional gardeners. In 1951, Otto Stern developed and Horace Hagedorn sold the product. The plant food has been very successful since that time. The Miracle-Gro product line now includes speciality foods for specific plant types as well as potting soil that includes Miracle-Gro and a line of organic products. Miracle-Gro is generally thought to be safe for humans, plants and animals, but there are some negative effects that gardeners should know about.

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Effects if Swallowed or Inhaled

If a solution of Miracle-Gro and water or Miracle-Gro powder alone is swallowed, it can cause nausea and vomiting. It contains urea, which can irritate the mouth, throat, oesophagus and stomach. According to the Manufacturer's Safety Data Sheet for Miracle-Gro, if the product is swallowed, immediately rinse the mouth out with water. If the victim is found within 30 minutes of ingestion, "give the person a small glass of water or milk–never give anything by mouth to an unconscious person." Medical attention should be sought immediately. Call a doctor or poison control centre and do not induce vomiting unless instructed to do so.

Eyes and Skin

If Miracle-Gro powder or solution is rubbed on the skin or eyes, it could cause minor irritation. Flush eyes out immediately with water for approximately 15 minutes. Rinse affected area of skin with water, then wash with soap and water. If the irritation continues, seek medical attention.

Inhalation

If the dust of Miracle-Gro is inhaled, it can cause coughing, nasal discharge and upper respiratory irritation. A person who has inhaled the dust should be removed to an area with fresh air and monitored for continued irritation. If coughing or additional problems persist, seek out medical help.

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About the Author

Michelle Hogan is a writer and the author of 13 books including the 2005 bestselling memoir, "Without a Net: Middle Class and Homeless (With Kids) in America." Hogan studied English at American University and has been writing professionally since 1998. Her work has appeared in "The New York Times," "Redbook," "Family Circle" and many other publications.

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