Types of lawn moss

Written by k.c. morgan
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Types of lawn moss
Moss can make a lush, green lawn. (moss image by Amjad Shihab from Fotolia.com)

Some gardeners may find moss on their property and immediately run for the herbicide, but mosses can actually be used to create a beautiful lawn. Low-maintenance mosses have no roots, require no mowing and thrive even in shaded areas. To keep moss looking great, keep it free of leaves to enjoy a beautiful, green ground cover year-round. Some types of lawn moss are wonderful additions to your yard, while other varieties are regarded as pests.

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Fern Moss

Fern moss is a common type of lawn moss, historically used in Japanese temples to provide attractive ground cover. Found throughout the world, fern moss is a hardy perennial that grows 4 to 6 inches high.

Fern moss needs shade, lots of nutrients and a moderate amount of water to grow properly. If there is not enough shade present for fern moss, it will dry up and turn brown. Fern moss thrives in areas with high levels of humidity.

Cushion Moss

Cushion moss gets its unusual name from its round growth pattern and dense, cushion-like consistency. Like most mosses, cushion most performs best in shade but will tolerate some sunlight. Cushion moss is white, blue-green or grey in colour, reaching approximately 3 inches in height. White cushion moss is a popular landscaping plant because of its lush, thick growth. Grow cushion moss in moist, well-shaded areas of your lawn.

Rock Cap Moss

Rock cap moss gets its name because it habitually grows on large boulders, though it can be an attractive type of lawn moss. Dense rock cap moss has a rich, deep green colour. Rock cap moss is a well-used plant in Japanese gardens. Rock cap moss is a strong survivor, flourishing even in harsh growing and weather conditions and many different soil types.

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