What Kind of Flooring Should You Put in a Gazebo?

Written by chris rowling
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What Kind of Flooring Should You Put in a Gazebo?
There are many types of flooring available for gazebos. (gazebo sunset image by Janet Wall from Fotolia.com)

A gazebo is an open-sided structure used for outdoor functions. It can be used to house the catering, bar, or in the case of larger versions, a dance floor. The flooring for a gazebo is very specific because, as it has no sides, it is open to the elements. When the weather has been dry for a while and the gazebo is on level ground this is not a problem, but on wet grass or uneven terrain there can be issues.

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Waterproof Sheet

This is the most basic flooring that can be put down in a gazebo. It consists of a simple waterproof sheet, similar to a ground sheet for a tent, and is designed simply to keep the floor dry and the occupiers' feet out of the mud.

Wooden

Laminate flooring can also be purchased or hired for a gazebo. This is a lot more expensive than a waterproof sheet, but offers a very firm surface to walk on. This is much more suitable if the gazebo will be used for dancing or have to support heavy tables and chairs.

Matting

This is really only one stage up from the waterproof sheet. It usually has a waterproof lining underneath, but offers a much more solid surface to stand on and is not a susceptible to uneven ground.

Carpeting

If you are holding a larger function in a gazebo you may want to consider carpeting. It stops tables and chairs from moving around, as there is some grip to the surface, and offers a more luxurious atmosphere. The main issue here is that wooden flooring needs to be put down underneath the carpet, making this an expensive option, and the carpet itself is not waterproof.

Stone

Limestone, granite, marble and various other stones can also be used as flooring in a gazebo. This only works if you have a permanent gazebo in your back garden, as the flagstones require cement to keep them together and a settling period before they are used.

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