Causes of cloudy vision & dizziness

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Causes of cloudy vision & dizziness
Cloudy vision and dizziness can make a person feel sick and afraid to leave the house. (dizziness image by Alexander Oshvintsev from Fotolia.com)

Dizziness and cloudy vision are common causes of visits to the doctor, often develop suddenly, and might last for just a moment or two or for several days or longer. Symptoms such as dizziness and cloudy vision can be incapacitating, and can interfere with the ability to drive, work and perform routine household tasks. Identifying and treating the causes of dizziness and cloudy vision can help people resume their usual activities.

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Medical Conditions

Diabetes can cause dizziness and cloudy vision, especially during times when blood sugar is not well-controlled; people with hypoglycaemia can also develop dizziness. High blood pressure can interfere with circulation to the brain and cause cloudy vision and dizziness, as can sudden changes in blood pressure. People with anaemia, high cholesterol and arteriosclerosis might develop dizziness and visual problems as well. Dizziness and cloudy vision can also result from allergic reactions to foods or airborne irritants, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology. Disorders of the eye, including glaucoma, macular degeneration and eye infections might also result in dizziness and cloudy vision, as can diabetic retinopathy, which is a complication of diabetes. Fatigue and overexposure to severe weather conditions can also cause dizziness and cloudy vision, as can near- or farsightedness, according to the National Library of Medicine.

Neurological Disorders

Stroke is a neurological disorder that can cause sudden dizziness and cloudy or blurred vision; this condition is a medical emergency. Dizziness and cloudy vision can also result from other serious neurological disorders, including multiple sclerosis, late-stage syphilis and brain haemorrhage. People with seizure disorders such as epilepsy might develop cloudy vision and dizziness as a side effect of their anti-seizure medications. According to the Mayo Clinic, people with anxiety disorders such as panic attacks might also develop dizziness and cloudy vision. Migraines can also cause cloudy vision and dizziness. Other neurological disorders, such as optic neuromas and brain tumours, might also cause cloudy vision and dizziness, according to the National Library of Medicine.

Vestibular Disorders

Disorders with the vestibular labyrinth in the inner ear can result in dizziness, and visual and hearing disturbances. Sudden onset of dizziness and cloudy vision might result from acute vestibular neuronitis, an abnormal inflammation of the vestibular nerve. Meniere's disease, an abnormal build-up of fluid in the inner ear, can also cause dizziness, cloudy vision and muffled hearing. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can cause cloudy or blurry vision and dizziness, and result from sudden movements of the head, especially early in the morning. Acoustic neuroma, a non-cancerous tumour on the vestibular nerve, can also be a cause of dizziness and cloudy vision, according to the Mayo Clinic. Dizziness and cloudy vision might also result from inner ear infections that involve the vestibular labyrinth; upper respiratory infections such as colds, flu and sinus infections might also result in dizzness and cloudy vision, according to the American Academy of Otolaryngology.

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