Varieties of Hardy Hibiscus

Written by mary lougee
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The Hardy Hibiscus is a type of flower that is easy to grow because it can withstand much cooler climates than the original tropical type of Hibiscus. The Hardy varieties thrive outdoors as far north as zone four without harm from winter freezes as long as they receive a cover to protect them from a frost. The seven varieties are the Old Yella, Kopper King, Lord Baltimore, Lady Baltimore, Disco Belle Pink, Blue River II and Fireball.

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Old Yella

This Hardy Hibiscus sports a very light yellow bloom with the traditional yellow stamen, which has a bright red eye surrounding it. Old Yella has medium-green cylindrical leaves.

Kopper King

This variety has pale pink petals with a bright red centre. The stamen is the standard yellow colour and the petals are slightly ruffled. Kopper King has medium-green cylindrical leaves.

Lord Baltimore/Lady Baltimore

The Lord Baltimore Hardy Hibiscus is a creation of Robert Darby of Maryland who crossbred several wild Hibiscuses together to form a brilliant red flower. His next project appeared as a blue and red hibiscus named Lady Baltimore. These two types have dark green foliage.

Disco Belle Pink

This variety is a pale pink like the Kopper King with the same colour stamen and bright red eye. Each petal includes bright pink stripes on top of the light pink base colour. Disco Belle Pink is a classic variegated Hardy Hibiscus and has medium green leaves.

Blue River II

Blue River II is a stark white blooming Hardy Hibiscus with light green foliage. Each leaf is a cylindrical shape with lobes on each leaf like an oak tree. This variety does not have a red eye but does have the traditional yellow stamen.

Fireball

Fireball Hardy Hibiscus has the brightest display of all the Hardy varieties. The blooms are solid deep burgundy and the foliage is a deep purple colour with lobed leaves.

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