Types of Hot Wheels Track Connectors

Written by rachel murdock
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Hot Wheels cars and racetracks are classic toys sold by Mattel. There are classic and speciality Hot Wheels track sets featuring special elements, electrical components and decorative accents. The tracks use some speciality connectors, but most Hot Wheels tracks are connected with standard connectors.

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Standard Connectors

The standard connectors for Hot Wheels tracks are made of thin plastic in a variety of colours, depending on the set with which they are sold. The connectors slide into the channels under each of the pieces of track. The connector goes into one piece of track about halfway, then another piece of track slides onto the other half of the connector to hook the tracks together.

Serpentine Connector

Serpentine connectors come in some Hot Wheels track kits. They are small sections of track that snap together without the use of slot connectors. These pieces of track can make curves and S-shaped sections of track.

Loop Connectors

Many Hot Wheels tracks have 360-degree loops made from a section of track and two connectors. These loop connectors have a piece at the bottom that slides into the slot under the piece of track entering the loop. The connector slopes up from the bottom. The sloped section has a groove that allows the slot under another piece of track to slide onto it. The piece of track is looped around and then connects to another loop connector facing the opposite direction to form a loop. Some sets include multiple loops.

Starter Connectors

Some Hot Wheels tracks have a starter piece. These pieces have a screw portion that allows the beginning piece of track to be attached to a table or counter. These beginning connectors have extensions that slip into the slots under standard Hot Wheels tracks. Some sets accommodate two tracks so that two cars can race at the same time.

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