How long should a sofa last?

Written by melody hughes
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How long should a sofa last?
If you have pets, the life of your sofa will likely be reduced. ( Images)

A sofa or couch is one of the most expensive pieces of furniture in most homes. For this reason, most people would like for their sofas to last numerous years so that they get their money's worth out of the sofa. For a longer-lasting sofa, invest in quality and maintain regular upkeep of the sofa.

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Average Lifespan

The average lifespan of a couch or sofa is 10 to 15 years, according to The Nest's Amy Spencer. Beyond this time frame, the upholstery may be worn while the frame may still be usable. In this case, reupholstering the couch or sofa may be cheaper than buying a new one. However, if the frame is weak, reupholstering the sofa would not be economical since the frame may not have much life left in it.


The life of a sofa or couch largely depends on its construction. Good Housekeeping recommends selecting a sofa with a sturdy frame made of oak, ash or beech rather than a softer wood such as pine or another material such as particle wood, plastic or metal. Frames should be held firmly together with wooden dowels or wooden corner blocks. Also, choose a sofa with springs, not mesh or webbing. The longest-lasting filling is high-resilient foam, and the longest-lasting fabrics are tight-woven cotton or linen and microfiber.


Properly caring for your couch will increase its longevity. Avoid placing your couch in direct sunlight because the sun will fade fabric couches and cause leather couches to crack. Regularly vacuum around and under cushions to prevent crumbs and other debris from causing additional wear. Clean wooden legs or accents with oil-based wood cleaners.

Furniture Protection Plans

You may want to buy a furniture protection plan whenever you purchase a new sofa or couch. This plan will repair your sofa in the case of accidental damage, such as something poking a hole in the couch or something being spilt on a couch. It will not, however, pay for repairs for normal wear and tear that results from everyday usage or for damage done by pets.

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