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What Is the Largest Size a Word Document Can Be?

Updated July 20, 2017

According to Microsoft Support, the largest size a Word file can be is 32MB for the total document, not including pictures or other graphics. That means that a file containing pictures or other graphics could be larger than 32MB. It is important to remember that this limit is not the limit on the size of a file Word can open. According to Microsoft Support, the maximum file size Windows can open is 512MB.

Parameters in Word 2007/Word 2010

Microsoft Word puts limits on other operating parameters as well. According to Microsoft, for Word 2007/Word 2010 the maximum number of each of the following are: 2,147,483,647 bookmarks; 4,079 styles; 2,147,483,647 comments; 2,147,483,647 fields; 255 subdocuments in a master document; 2,147,483,647 moves; 2,147,483,647 range permissions; and 10,000 records to display in a recipients list dialogue box.

Parameters in Word 2007/Word 2010 Compatibility Mode

For older versions of Word in which you might need to use compatibility mode, the following restrictions are in place: 16,380 bookmarks; 4.079 styles; 16,380 comments, 255 subdocuments in a master document; 2,147,483,647 fields; 32,752 moves; 32,752 range permissions; and 10,000 records to display in a recipients list dialogue box.

Maximum File Size Word Can Open

The maximum file size Word can open, in both normal and compatibility mode, is 512MB. Remember that most e-mail services will not be able to accommodate transfers of this size. Gmail, for example, has a file size limit of 25MB.

Character Limit Dialog Boxes

It is possible with Microsoft Word to create dialogue boxes that limit the number of characters allowed, though this will not limit the number of words. To do so, you will need to use the Form Field Option dialogue, which you can access from the toolbars menu. Bring up the Text Form Field Options pop-up. From there, you can simply type in the number of characters you want to allow in the field.

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About the Author

Nate Brown has been writing about California, economics and music for more than five years. He holds a Master of Science in economic history from the London School of Economics and a Bachelor of Arts in international political economy from University of California, Berkeley. Brown's work has appeared in "The Beaver."