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What Can I Use to Get Permanent Stains Out of a Vinyl Purse?

Updated April 17, 2017

Vinyl purses make stylish and trendy handbags, but they're easily dirtied and stained. If you get a permanent stain on your vinyl purse, you may exacerbate the stain if you try to remove it with the wrong product or technique. Only certain products are safe to use for stain removal on vinyl.

Butter

Butter is safe to use on vinyl. To remove a stain, take a cold stick of salted butter and rub the tip onto the stain. Place the purse in direct sunlight, such as outdoors or near a window. Allow the butter two hours to be absorbed by the stain. The oil in the butter softens the stain, and the salt draws the stain out of the fabric. Sprinkle salt on top of the butter if you only have unsalted butter.

Hairspray

Hairspray is commonly used to remove ink stains from vinyl products, including handbags. Squirt the hairspray directly onto the stain. Mist but don't saturate the stain. Allow the hairspray to sit for a few minutes for the stain to absorb the chemicals. Before the hairspray dries, rub the stain with a tissue or paper towel. Repeat the process if the tissue absorbs some but not all of the stain.

Detergent

Clear liquid laundry or dish detergent is a safe product to use for stain removal on vinyl purses. Pour a few drops of the liquid detergent directly onto the stain. To avoid oversaturating, use a medicine dropper. Use your fingers to work the detergent into the vinyl to remove the stain. Gently rub between your fingers until the stain has faded. Rinse with lukewarm water.

White Spirit or Hydrogen Peroxide

White spirit and hydrogen peroxide effectively remove stains from vinyl purses. For coloured vinyl, apply white spirit to the stain. For white vinyl, use hydrogen peroxide, which has bleaching properties. Dip a cloth into the white spirit or hydrogen peroxide then dab the stain. Gently apply pressure and rub the stain out of the vinyl.

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About the Author

Audrey Farley began writing professionally in 2007. She has been featured in various issues of "The Mountain Echo" and "The Messenger." Farley has a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of Richmond and a Master of Arts in English literature from Virginia Commonwealth University. She teaches English composition at a community college.