What Is a Capless Wig?

Written by susan revermann Google
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What Is a Capless Wig?
The wigs used centuries ago were solid, hot and uncomfortable. (Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

People wearing wigs dates back for centuries. Fortunately, the construction of wigs has come a long way since then. The wig industry has revolutionised its design to be adjustable, more comfortable, cooler and breathable. Capless wigs are a specific design of wig that can be worn by people with or without hair. You will find capless wigs used to complement a costume, as a fashion accessory, to change up a look or to mimic real hair after hair thinning or loss.

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Definition

A capless wig is a specific type of wig construction that people wear. It has rows of hair sewn together without an underlying solid cap underneath.

Construction

The wefts of hair are sewn onto thin cotton or lace ribbons, instead of being a solid cap of hair. These ribbons are then constructed together on the wig. The ribbons are flexible and stretch so they can shape to the head of the wearer. There are also adjustable straps or hooks at the nape of the neck to secure the wig in place. The adjustable straps are often made of Velcro.

Advantages

Capless wigs allow your head to stay cooler than solid capped wigs. This is due to the fact that it is made with less hair and the specific capless construction allows for some air flow to the head and scalp. Earlier in wig construction, they were made without adjustable straps, they were much hotter and they only came in one size.

Type of Hair

The hair used to make capless wigs can be synthetic hair or human hair. The later material will most likely be more expensive, although it depends on the quality of the product, where the wig is made and the specific manufacturer.

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