Can Cherry Pits Go in Compost Piles?

Written by annie kluza
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Can Cherry Pits Go in Compost Piles?
Cherry pits are also called cherry stones and are almost as hard. (Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images)

When starting a compost pile it is best to find out what you can actually add to your pile. It isn't the best idea to put cherry and other fruit pits in compost piles as they take up to 10 years to decompose and can sprout. But there are some steps to follow so you can add them to your compost pile.

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Blend Cherry Pits

In order to add cherry pits to your compost pile, you should speed the process up by soaking the cherry pits in water over night. Add to a pot with water and boil for half an hour. Let the liquid cool and then place in a blender or food processor. Blend for a couple minutes until it is quite smooth. Add the mixture to your compost pile and let it do its magic.

Grind Cherry Pits

Another way to add cherry stones to your compost pile is to place the cherry pits on a baking dish and roast for 30 minutes at 177 degrees Celsius. After letting the pits cool down, put them in a coffee grinder and grind to a powder. Put the powder on compost powder and they definitely won't sprout.

Items to Put in Compost Pile

Compost piles should be balanced, with about two-thirds being "green" and one-third "brown." The green material is nitrogen-rich and includes such items as coffee grounds, tea leaves, fruit and vegetable, grass clippings, egg shells, weeds and bread. Brown material is the carbon-rich material needed and includes dried leaves, ash, straw and hay.

Items to Leave Out of Compost Pile

It is as important to know what to leave out of the compost pile as what to put into it. It may seem a no-brainer, but don't add anything toxic such as yew trees or bushes. Also, keep the poison ivy away. In addition, pet waste and kitty litter may have parasites, so don't add them to the pile. Other items to keep out of your compost pile include meat scraps, fatty trash and cooking oils.

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