Ways of delaying divorce

Written by hans fredrick
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Ways of delaying divorce
Delaying tactics or decisions can stave off a divorce. (Jupiterimages/liquidlibrary/Getty Images)

When divorce is not mutually agreed on, one party may want to use delaying tactics to try and prolong the marriage. Sometimes this is done out of spite, but in other times there may be a genuine desire to save the marriage. In those cases, delaying tactics can be employed to stretch out the time before a divorce is finalised.

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Counselling

Divorce seems inevitable to some couples who are experiencing severe troubles in their marriage. However, even problems that seem insurmountable can be conquered with the right help. Seek marriage counselling rather than leaping into divorce, if you want to honestly give your marriage a fair chance. A counsellor helps couples identify problems that are difficult to articulate and assists in a clear and open dialogue. This is often much more constructive than the way couples, especially those fighting or in trouble, communicate with each other.

Agreement for Future Divorce

Sometimes, two parents come to an agreement that divorce should be delayed until children reach a certain age. This is an option if the parents can act civil in front of the children, and as long as they raise the children in a healthy and supportive environment. This type of mutual agreement provides stability for children, but also helps adults who desire a divorce see an eventual light at the end of the tunnel.

Delay Signing Papers

When one person in a marriage wants to initiate a divorce, a divorce petition must be filed. In a mutually agreed upon divorce, the other party simply signs a response to that document and it proceeds. If you refuse to sign divorce papers for more than thirty days, you default. However, you do have those thirty days to sign. By putting off signing for close to the limit, you can create a small delay.

Do Not Settle

If you agree to a settlement before the divorce goes to trial, the proceedings will be over quickly. If you cannot come to a settlement, a full hearing will be required. This involves things like the calling of witnesses in order to determine factors such as custody of children. Reaching a hearing delays the divorce somewhat. Further delays are best left in the hands of your legal counsel.

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