Traditional roofing methods

Written by timothy bodamer
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Traditional roofing methods
A good roof is key in protecting people and possessions. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

There are different roof constructions for homes or buildings. A flat roof commonly appears on simple structures, while a hip roof is a type more likely to appear on a barn or stable. Timber and shed roofs are other types used. A roof's style is dependent on the type of structure.

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Flat Roofs

A flat roof naturally doesn't fit architecturally because a roof must shed snow and rain. However, this roof can have a practical use and usually is found on some portions of modern homes. Flat roofs often appear over shed dormers, balconies and garages. A flat roof also can come with a 20-year warranty because of the adverse weather conditions it might face.

Hip Roof

A hip roof is used for rectangular home plans. The hip roof has a symmetrical appearance because it rises at the same pitch from all sides, reaching a centre point. The hip roof also possesses overhangs to push water away from the structure.

Skillion Roof

A Skillion roof is separate from the main structure's roof, but it follows the look of the main structure's roof and uses the same materials. For example, a small room addition follows a rectangular plan that aligns the roof with the rest of home. The roof pitch of the addition would be determined by the house's roof pitch.

Timber Roof

The timber roof is pitched and most often is found on a cabin or at a resort. These roofs are heavy, costly and labour-intensive. In addition, this roof requires either a "king" post (a post that serves as the roof's support) or a "queen" post. These are trusses that use one or two beams as support, with surrounding tie beams and rafters. The result is a vaulted, open ceiling that also offers a view of the timbers from inside.

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