Crafts Using Glass Electrical Insulators

Written by michael belcher Google
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Crafts Using Glass Electrical Insulators
Glass insulators were eventually replaced with cheaper ceramic and synthetic insulators. (David McNew/Getty Images News/Getty Images)

Glass electrical insulators were designed to insulate wooden electrical poles, first from telegraph lines, and later from electrical power lines. From the 1800s until the 1960s, manufacturers produced hundreds of thousands of glass insulators in many different styles and colours of glass. Due to their unique look, ready availability, and multiple colour choices, glass insulators have become a popular crafting item.

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LED Electric Lamps

Light Emitting Diodes, or LEDs, are low-powered light sources that come in a variety of colours. Together with a small power source --- usually a watch battery --- a small LED can fit into small spaces. Place an LED light in the cavity of an insulator to make a small lamp. Use these lamps as night lights or emergency lights, or as accent lights in a large room or outdoor area after dark.

Candle Holders

Turn an insulator upside down to make a small candle holder. Use a small candle stand or small flower pot holder to steady insulators that have curved tops. Small candles and tea lights will easily fit into many larger insulators.

Vases

Match a larger glass insulator with a small stand or pot holder to make a small vase. A few small or short-stemmed flowers can quickly fill a large insulator and bring a dash of colour to a room.

Hanging Lights

Use glass insulators as hanging pendant-style lamp shades. Drill a hole through the top of the insulator and thread the light fixture through the hole. Use a diamond drill bit to drill through glass without cracking the insulator. Opaque blue or brown insulators can help diffuse the light around the room.

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