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Science Projects for Heating Ice With Water

Updated May 25, 2017

Science is taught to children at a young age, and the subject is generally divided into physics, biology and chemistry. In middle school and above, experiments are performed every week, and at the end of the year, students are required to design and conduct an experiment. An example of a physics science project is the investigation of heating ice with water.

Equipment Needed and Initial Setup

A Bunsen burner, tripod and mesh, large Pyrex beaker and ice cubes will be needed to conduct all experiments. To set up the experiment, light the Bunsen burner and adjust it to the desired heat. Place the tripod and mesh over the Bunsen burner. Put a fixed amount of water into the beaker with a fixed number of ice cubes.

Amount of Ice

Investigate the time it takes to melt different amounts of ice. Place one ice cube into the beaker and use a stopwatch to time the melting. The experiment can be repeated for two, three and four ice cubes. To ensure the experiment is fair be sure to keep the Bunsen burner at the same heat, and make sure that the beaker has cooled completely.

Amount of Water

This project investigates how the amount of water initially put into the beaker affects the rate of melting. Place a fixed amount of water into the beaker with one ice cube. Time how long it takes for the ice cube to melt. Repeat the experiment with different amounts of water.

Salinity of Water

This project investigates how salt affects the melting process. Place a fixed amount of water into the beaker along with a fixed amount of salt and water. Time how long it takes for the ice cube to melt. Repeat the experiment for different amounts of salt but fix the amount of water and number of ice cubes.

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About the Author

Samuel Markings has been writing for scientific publications for more than 10 years, and has published articles in journals such as "Nature." He is an expert in solid-state physics, and during the day is a researcher at a Russell Group U.K. university.