Wedding set styles from the 1970s

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Wedding set styles from the 1970s
Wedding sets are wedding rings in a set for engagement and weddings. (Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images)

During the 1970s, wedding ring styles and sets changed from rings seen in previous generations. Sets often included engagement rings, wedding rings and even men's matching rings, depending on the preferred set and the couple. Before the 1950s, men did not exchange rings and only women wore a wedding ring. It wasn't until the 1970s that men began to commonly wear wedding rings as part of a set with his bride's ring. Many of today's wedding set styles originated in the 1970s and evolved from those designs.

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Princess Cut Rings

Princess cut wedding rings, also called "square modified brilliant" settings, started in the 1970s. Princess cut is the name for the way the diamond in the ring is cut and set into the ring. The cut is square, but the diamond sparkles in spite of the cut style.

Enhancer Rings

The sets that have a simple ring enhances the engagement ring to add detailing or a sleek look to the original ring given in the set. This type of ring has an elaborate engagement ring but allows the wedding ring to show simplicity.

Contour Style

The contour style sets were rings where the enhancer shapes around the engagement ring moulded the rings together when put on at the wedding. This allows for comfort and style without distracting from a stunning engagement ring.

Men's Wedding Rings

Men began wearing wedding rings more commonly during the 1970s. Men's rings were simple styles and were often without the embellishments of a woman's ring, such as diamonds. Men's rings were typically in the same material as the woman's set, such as both rings having yellow or white gold to make the rings a matching set.

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