Interesting Speech Topics for Teens

Written by marissa meyer
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Interesting Speech Topics for Teens
The most confident speakers work hard to customise topics to their audience. (Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images)

Speech classes are required in most high school curricula. Gathering the courage to speak in front of your classmates is no easy feat, but long before you step up to the podium, you must choose a topic. Because your audience consists primarily of teenagers, make sure the topic you select appeals to their interests. Speeches that keep the attention of the audience are sure to be noticed and rewarded with high grades.

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Informative Speeches

An informative speech requires detailed research on a topic. The topic you select should resonate with your teen audience and be easy to research. Find a topic you can discuss in an objective, straightforward manner. You could choose a favourite celebrity or historical figure. Teens who are excited about getting their driver's license may be interested in a speech about the history behind certain automobile manufacturers or the features of specific car models. Sports teams draw the attention of teenage ears, and plenty of information is available to use in a speech about the story behind your favourite team.

Interesting Speech Topics for Teens
An interesting topic will keep the attention of a potentially wild crowd. (Michael Blann/Lifesize/Getty Images)

Instructive Speeches

The topic you select for an instructive speech should be one you're familiar with and can explain to your audience step by step. You may use props and tools as part of your demonstration. Try to think of topics that would be useful in the daily life of an average teen. If you know a recipe for a great after-school snack or party appetizer, demonstrate the recipe and how to make it. Use crafting skills to demonstrate easy projects that appeal to your audience -- for example, you could explain how to use sewing skills to turn an old pair of jeans into a "new" miniskirt. In the age of digital cameras and social networking, many teens would enjoy a demonstration of basic photography skills.

Interesting Speech Topics for Teens
Demonstrating as you speak takes practice. (Jupiterimages/Comstock/Getty Images)

Persuasive Speeches

When delivering a persuasive speech, provide your listeners with information on a controversial subject, convince them why they should take a particular side of the issue, then call them to action. Your topic should be one you feel strongly about, because your passion will shine through as you speak. Your goal is to inspire your audience to feel the same passion.

Think about issues in your high school. If the cafeteria food is unhealthful, persuade your audience to write letters to the school board requesting change. If you are disappointed with small turnouts at pep rallies, persuade your audience to support their sports teams. You can also choose broader topics that interest teenagers, such as whether they should get an after-school job.

Interesting Speech Topics for Teens
Choose a topic you know your classmates care about. (Jupiterimages/Goodshoot/Getty Images)

Fun Speeches

Fun speeches should be entertaining, conversational and unscripted. Select a topic you can discuss in a lighthearted, humorous fashion without much preparation. You may decide to give a congratulatory speech to your school's football team or your favourite teacher. If you have a favourite book or movie genre, you could discuss what it is and why you like it. A fun speech is an opportunity to connect with your teenage audience by selecting relatable topics such as "Why High School Is (or Isn't) the Best Time of Your Life" or "The Top 10 Best Ways to Ask for a Date to the Prom."

Interesting Speech Topics for Teens
Fun speeches are used as icebreakers in speech classes. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

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