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Costume Ideas for Ancient Civilization

Updated July 20, 2017

Creating ancient civilisation costumes are a fun way to introduce kids to history, as well as for adults to do something different for Halloween. Because ancient fabrics were generally simple, most costumes can be made with sheets and plain cloth. Creating fake jewellery, swords, and armour is where creativity really kicks in, and where you can truly personalise your costume.

Roman Toga

Togas are relatively simple costumes that can be constructed out of standard bed sheets. To take a basic toga to the next level, create a toga with historically symbolic colours. For example, a purple toga with gold trim would designate you a victorious general. Augment your toga with a crown of laurels, sandals, and fake jewels.

Druid Mystic

The Druids were a mysterious culture that left few written records, but that just gives you more opportunity to be creative. Colourful robes, Celtic patterns, floral garlands, and face paint are all ideas you can play with. Try combining a robe with henna body paint and accenting with a carved walking stick.

Egyptian Queen

Egyptian clothing was made from simple, fine linen. Women wore long dresses, and men generally wore kilts. The nobility accented these plain garments with elaborate jewellery, including heavy necklaces, wigs, dyed capes, and earrings. To create an Egyptian costume, have fun playing with 'big hair' and elaborate fake jewelery. Heavy Hollywood-style eye make-up adds another theatrical touch.

Greek Warrior

Greek warriors wore tunics, coupled with kilts, leg guards, and elaborate helmets. For a costume, construct body armour out of cardboard, spray paint soccer shin guards, and attach decorations to a standard bicycle helmet. You can also create a large, round shield by modifying a dustbin lid. Fake swords made out of cardboard and wrapped with tin foil are another possible accessory.

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About the Author

Lauren Agra began writing professionally in 2010. She is a copywriter for Subports Internet retail and before that she assisted the editorial department of Peachtree Publishers. Agra received her Bachelor of Arts in English from Emory University and a Master of Philosophy in literature from Trinity College Dublin.