Parchment Craft Tools

Written by cat reynolds
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Parchment Craft Tools
Parchment crafts were originally made by monks and nuns. (Hemera Technologies/PhotoObjects.net/Getty Images)

Parchment crafts -- folded, perforated, embossed and coloured cards and art objects made with parchment, inks and other colouring agents -- originated in Europe during the 15th or 16th century. Today's crafters often refer to the art as "Pergamano" instead of parchment craft. To make parchment crafts, you will need a variety of tools and other supplies, which are available at fine arts stores.

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The Tools

To get started making parchment crafts, you will need a hard embossing mat, embossers, nibs and nib pen, a fine-ball scriber, specialised single-needle piercing tool for perforating, shaders -- which are small metal tools -- of assorted shapes, scissors and a craft knife. You will also soon want patterns to work from. They are available online for free and in parchment craft books.

Learn to Use Your Tools

After you buy tools and parchment, Dorothy Holness of the Parchment Craft Guild advises "doodling" with them to get a feel for what you can accomplish and how they work. Various shaders, for example, will create different shades of white and grey. Different size tools also create varying whites and line effects.

Study photos of completed projects if you don't have access to real works. When you're ready to learn more, complete online tutorials and attend classes at an art store or crafters' event.

Colouring Agents

In addition to folding, cutting and shading the parchment, you will also want to add colour. You will need coloured inks, including white, and white pencils and oil pastels. You can buy coloured parchment paper in addition to the traditional beige. You also need a craft glue that dries clear.

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