How to Get the SNMP Community String in Linux

Written by ed stanyer
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to Get the SNMP Community String in Linux
SNMP is commonly used to monitor the health of network-enabled devices. (Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a network protocol used to manage and monitor network devices. To provide a level of security, SNMP uses a community string that acts in a similar way as a password. If a request is made to an SNMP-enabled device, the community strings must match between the two devices to make a response. Changing the default community string is a security best practice.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

Other People Are Reading

Instructions

    Get Community String

  1. 1

    Load a shell prompt.

  2. 2

    Enter "cd /etc./snmp/" and press "Enter."

  3. 3

    Enter "vi snmpd.conf" and press "Enter."

  4. 4

    Find the line that starts with "rocommunity"; the rest of this line is the SNMP community string.

    Change Community String

  1. 1

    Load a shell prompt.

  2. 2

    Enter "cd /etc./snmp/" and press "Enter."

  3. 3

    Enter "vi snmpd.conf" and press "Enter."

  4. 4

    Edit the line that starts with "rocommunity," leave a space after this and then enter the new string that you wish to use as the SNMP community string. Save the file.

  5. 5

    Enter "service snmpd stop" and press "Enter."

  6. 6

    Enter "service snmpd start" and press "Enter." This will start the SNMP service up with the new community string.

Tips and warnings

  • To improve security on your SNMP-enabled devices, always make sure you change the default community name of "public" to something longer and more complex.
  • Take a backup of the snmpd.conf file before making any changes. An incorrect syntax in the file can prevent the SNMP service from starting up.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.