How to Make a Scabbard for a Longsword

Written by crystal vogt
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How to Make a Scabbard for a Longsword
Longsword blades are usually housed in scabbards. (Hemera Technologies/ Images)

A scabbard, also known as a sheath, is used to house the blade of sword. Scabbards can come in many different sizes and shapes depending on the length and type of sword. Longswords, which were the weapon of choice for knights during the Medieval period, are long, straight-bladed swords with a cross above the grip and a long handle that can accommodate both hands during sword fights. To make a scabbard for a longsword, choose a durable fabric such as leather or vinyl to sheath the blade.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Leather
  • Fabric chalk
  • Ruler
  • Pen
  • Scissors
  • Rag
  • Hole puncher
  • Leather cord

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  1. 1

    Purchase two yards of leather. For an inexpensive alternative to leather, purchase two yards of vinyl in an earth-toned colour such as brown or tan. Lay your fabric on a table.

  2. 2

    Place your sword on the fabric and use fabric chalk to trace around the sword's blade only. Do not include the handle in your tracing. Remove the sword. You should now have an outline of the blade.

  3. 3

    Measure with a ruler a half inch outside of the beginning of the outline where the base of the blade would be. Make a mark at this point. Continuing up the outline of the blade, make a dot every 2 inches that is a half inch away from the outline. Use your pen to connect all of these dots. You should now have two near identically shaped outlines: a smaller one in fabric chalk and a larger one in pen. At the open base of these two outlines, draw a straight line from one side of the larger base to the other, closing the "blade" outline.

  4. 4

    Cut out your larger, pen outline with scissors. Wipe off the fabric chalk outline on this piece of fabric with a rag.

  5. 5

    Lay this piece on another piece of your fabric and trace around it with a pen. Remove your first piece and cut out the piece you drew the outline on. You should now have two identically shaped pieces of fabric. Lay these symmetrically on top of one another.

  6. 6

    Punch a hole near the edge of your pieces of fabric using a hole puncher, starting from the blade's "base" end. Ensure that the hole is punched all the way through both pieces of fabric that are stacked on one another. The hole should be about a quarter inch in from the outer edge. Make a second hole about 1 inch away from your first, and a quarter inch away from the outer edge. Continue punching holes all the way around the perimeter of the fabric pieces until you get to the other end of the "base." Avoid punching holes along the short, straight-lined end of the base.

  7. 7

    Purchase a spool of leather or vinyl cord in the same colour as your fabric. Thread one end of your cord through the first hole on the right side of your sheath's "base." Pull the cord out the other side of the hole, bring the cord up and over the fabric's edge toward you, and thread it through the second hole. Repeat, bringing the cord up and over the fabric's edge toward you after threading each hole. Continue until you've laced through all of the holes. Clip the cord with scissors from the spool, leaving 4 extra inches on either end.

  8. 8

    Knot the extra cord at either end of the "base" to prevent the cord from slipping out of the holes. Your two pieces of fabric should now be laced together. Slide your sword's blade into your homemade scabbard.

Tips and warnings

  • To attach the scabbard to your belt, punch one hole near the scabbard's opening. Thread a short piece of cord through this hole to tie onto your belt or belt loop.

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