How to match rpm with shifting

Written by kelvin hayes
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RPM matching, also known as "double clutching," is a method of shifting that prolongs the lifespans of both the transmission and clutch flywheel. This shifting technique aims to match the speed of the engine with the transmission's input shaft and interior gears, a technique that can be done during up and down shifting. This technique significantly benefits the clutch's flywheel by reducing the amount of initial stress placed on it as it attempts to marry the transmission to the driveshaft.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

    Up Shifting

  1. 1

    Remove your foot from the accelerator pedal.

  2. 2

    Press the clutch pedal down half way while simultaneously moving the gearshift to neutral. Release the clutch as the gear lever reaches neutral. At this point, the engine speed (RPM) will begin to drop, slowing the transmission input shaft to better match the transmission's gears. This step lasts only momentarily, as the engine speed will drop quickly. Make the second part of the shift swiftly, after reaching this neutral position.

  3. 3

    Press the clutch pedal down half way while simultaneously up shifting into the next gear. Release the clutch as you enter the new gear.

    Down Shifting

  1. 1

    Press the accelerator pedal down, briefly raising the engine's RPM.

  2. 2

    Release the accelerator and press the clutch pedal down half way while simultaneously moving the gearshift to neutral. Release the clutch as the gear lever reaches neutral and press the accelerator again to raise the engine speed slightly.

  3. 3

    Press the clutch pedal down half way while simultaneously down shifting into the next gear. Release the clutch as you enter the new gear.

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