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How to Write an Attestation Letter

Updated April 17, 2017

Letters of attestation are normally used when employing a new individual, but they can also be used for any type of verification. An attestation letter clearly confirms information or actions completed by an individual or a group. Such a letter should contain only the truth and will be retained by the recipient as a reference. An attestation letter should be short, formal and to the point.

Open the attestation letter with the date, month and year, then address the individual or company concerned. For example, "Dear Mr. Smith" or "Dear Employees." The address will provide a clear statement of who is concerned in the matter of attestation.

Write a solid body paragraph which concisely states the information you need to confirm. For example:

"I, Jane Doe, hereby confirm that I have completed the training on the safe workplace. I am now certified to remain in this work environment under company policy. I attest that the above statement is true and valid to the best of my knowledge."

Remember to include the final statement, which clearly confirms any statement you have made in the attestation letter.

Close the letter with a simple signature, such as "Sincerely," followed by your signed name directly underneath the closer. This signature will verify that you wrote and confirmed the attestation letter and statement.

Tip

Use precise language and make the tone of the letter formal. Do not use contractions or other slang terms. Edit the letter and look for any mistakes or ambiguous language.

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About the Author

Sarah Vrba has been a writer and editor since 2006. She has contributed to "Seed," "AND Magazine," Care2 Causes and "202 Magazine," among other outlets, focusing on fashion, pop culture, style and identity. Vrba holds an M.A. in history with an emphasis on gender and fashion in the 19th century.