How to Draw Old English Style Letters

Written by michael cantrell
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How to Draw Old English Style Letters
Old English lettering is a distinctive choice for logos and signs. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Old English calligraphy, also known as "blackletter," is used in making decorative signs, logos, bumper stickers, and even T-shirts. It is a common style used in official documents like diplomas and degrees. Newspapers, like "The New York Times," use Old English letters in their logo. To learn how to draw these types of letters, you will need some calligraphy tools, patience, and practice.

Skill level:
Challenging

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Things you need

  • Calligraphy pen
  • Ink
  • Lined tracing paper

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Get online and look up a picture of the Old English alphabet. Print the picture. You will be using this as a template as you create your own lettering. If you visit calligraphy sites, you may be able to find some pictures that outline specific strokes for different types of Old English styles.

  2. 2

    Place the calligraphy pen in your hand so that the broad side faces the meaty part of the palm of your writing hand. Put the tracing paper down over the picture of your Old English alphabet. Tracing the letters will help you become familiar with the strokes needed to make each letter until you can make them on your own.

  3. 3

    Practice writing every letter of the alphabet, both capitals and lower case. Each letter will be made up of different broad and thin strokes. To create the thin lines you will slide the tip of the calligraphy pen over the paper vertically. The thick lines will be made by moving the pen horizontally across the paper.

  4. 4

    Create basic words using Old English after you have mastered the strokes needed to create the letters. Continue to practice to keep your skills sharp.

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