How to Create a Grid in InDesign

Written by elle smith
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How to Create a Grid in InDesign
Grids allow you to place and evenly space elements on the page. (Ablestock.com/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)

A grid is a division of the page by horizontal or vertical guides into which text, images, columns or other graphic elements may be placed for precision alignment. A non-printing document grid is a common and useful feature in Adobe InDesign and looks like graph paper on the screen. The size of the grid can be easily customised to fit your design and layout requirements.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Launch InDesign. When setting up preferences or defaults, you don't need to open or create a new document.

  2. 2

    Select "Edit," then scroll down to "Preferences" and click on "Grids" if you're working in Windows, or choose "InDesign," then scroll down to "Preferences" and choose "Grids" if you're working in Mac OS X.

  3. 3

    Click the drill-down button next to "Color" to select a document grid line colour.

  4. 4

    Enter a value in the "Horizontal" pane next to "Gridline Every." Enter a value in the "Subdivisions" text box. This determines the spacing grid for the horizontal lines.

  5. 5

    Enter a value in "Vertical" pane next to "Gridline Every," then enter a value in the "Subdivisons" text box. This determines the spacing grid for the vertical lines.

  6. 6

    Place the grids behind your page elements by checking the box next to "Grids in Back," or deselect it to have your grid lines on top of your page elements.

  7. 7

    Click "OK."

  8. 8

    Select "New" from the "File" menu, then select "Document." Select "View" from the menu, then scroll to "Grids and Guides." Click next to "Show Document Grid" grid to show the document grid. Deselect it to hide the grid.

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