How to Sculpt a D&D Miniature

Written by james holloway Google
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How to Sculpt a D&D Miniature
Convincing anatomy is the key to a good figure. (Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images)

Miniatures can add visual interest and tactical detail to Wizards of the Coast's "Dungeons and Dragons" roleplaying game. Miniature figures can be used to represent player characters and their opponents. Players often go to great lengths to convert and paint miniatures to represent their characters. Try sculpting your own figurine. The sculpting process is simple, but adding detail allows for almost limitless customisation and creativity.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Model sketch
  • Wire armature or metal "dolly"
  • Light
  • Epoxy putty
  • Sculpting tools
  • Craft knife

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  1. 1

    Sketch out the design of your intended character. You'll be working with a three-dimensional model, so consider the character's appearance from several angles.

  2. 2

    Bend a wire armature -- a small wire model of a human body, roughly an inch high -- into the pose you want for your miniature. Use a "dolly," a metal anatomical model available from many miniatures companies. Work in a well-lit area.

  3. 3

    Apply a layer of epoxy putty to bulk out the figure's shape.

  4. 4

    Use putty to build up the shapes of the figure's musculature.

  5. 5

    Add another layer of putty, shaping it into the clothes, armour or other outer layer of the model. Use your sculpting tools and craft knife to shape the putty into folds and add details such as buttons and pockets.

  6. 6

    Add accessories such as weapons, bags or other items. Sculpt these or reuse parts from a "bits box."

  7. 7

    Sculpt the details of the face and hair. Needles and craft knives are good for incising the fine lines of the hair and teeth.

Tips and warnings

  • Always make sure that the previous layer of putty has cured completely before adding the next one.
  • Craft knives and sculpting tools are sharp; handle them with care.

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