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How to make broken mirror mosaics

Updated April 17, 2017

Shards of broken mirror glass are extremely effective in mosaic art. They reflect the light and add an extra dimension when they are used with other mosaic materials. Or you can use broken mirror pieces by themselves to create striking picture frames, coasters or vases, or to decorate the inside of decorative bowls.

Draw your design onto fibre board, or any other firm surface that you'd like to use as a base for your mosaic. Examples of bases include wood, ceramic tile, an old place mat, or a plain picture frame.

Gather your broken mirror pieces together, along with any other mosaic materials you intend to use in your design.

Glue your pieces of broken mirror onto your base using PVA glue, which is a white craft glue readily available in craft stores. Assemble the pieces of broken mirror as you would assemble a jigsaw, fitting them together but leaving a small gap between them. The size of gap is a matter of personal preference, so experiment to see which looks best.

Add other pieces of mosaic material such as crockery shards or mosaic tiles if you're using them after you have your pieces of broken mirror assembled as you would like. Allow the glue to try completely when all the pieces are in place.

Mix ordinary bathroom grout with water to a stiff consistency, then smooth between the mirror fragments and any other mosaic tiles you have used.

Wipe over the surface gently with a damp cloth to remove excess grout once the grout has hardened slightly. Allow the grout to set completely, then buff with a soft cloth, paying particular attention to the reflective mirror shards.

Tip

Coloured grouts are also available to buy, or you can dye your own by adding a tiny amount of oil paint as you're mixing your grout.

Warning

Broken mirror fragments are very sharp, so take care not to cut yourself.

Things You'll Need

  • Fibre board or other firm base
  • Broken mirror pieces
  • Marker pen or pencil
  • Craft glue
  • Grout
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About the Author

Deborah Jones started her freelance writing career in 1990. Her work has appeared in The Writer's Forum, "Reader's Digest" and numerous D.C. Thomson magazines. Jones has a Bachelor of Arts in creative writing and a postgraduate certificate in education, both from the University of Derby.