How to Draw a Scroll on Paper

Written by catherine paitsel
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How to Draw a Scroll on Paper
Scrolls were commonly used for religious purposes, especially in the Jewish religion. (Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images)

Scrolls are long pieces of paper used as decoration or to transfer messages. They are rolled around a cylinder, giving them curved edges. Some scrolls read up and down while others are designed to open side to side and read like a story book. Scroll templates are now used to symbolise important messages but are less common as actual methods of communication.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Draw two parallel lines on the paper the desired width of the scroll. Extend the line on the left upward into a spiral toward the outside of the page. Curve the spiral three times. Do the same at the bottom of the left side, only this time, draw the spiral curving toward the right.

  2. 2

    Draw a straight line from the end of the top spiral to the right, connecting the tip of the spiral to the curve of the next spiral. Do the same to the bottom spiral.

  3. 3

    Sketch a straight line from the highest point of the top spiral to the right then curve it slightly down to meet the right side of the scroll. Draw another straight line from the highest point of the bottom of the spiral, slightly extending past the right side of the scroll.

  4. 4

    Draw a straight line from the bottom of the lower curve the same length as the previous line. Connect the two with a line mimicking the curve of the spiral.

  5. 5

    Draw one more line from the bottom of the top spiral to the left edge of the scroll. Add writing or a picture to the scroll. Add cracks and tears along the edge to make the scroll look old.

Tips and warnings

  • Refer to a picture of a scroll while drawing.

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