How to Make the Best Flying Paper Planes

Written by brenda priddy
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How to Make the Best Flying Paper Planes
The larger an aeroplane's wings are, the longer it will stay in the air. (Comstock/Comstock/Getty Images)

The best paper aeroplanes are the ones that stay up in the air for the longest period of time. What makes a paper aeroplane stay in the air is lift. The opposite of lift is drag which is what causes the plane to fall. The larger the wings on the plane, the greater the lift. The more lift a plane has, the longer it will stay up and the farther it will go. You can make an aeroplane that will fly far with a non-traditional design that will float through the air, but also continue with purpose to the intended destination.

Skill level:
Easy

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Things you need

  • Paper
  • Scissors

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Fold a piece of paper in half lengthwise, but leave a small 1-inch tail of exposed paper on one side. Fold this flap of paper down and stick it between the two outer flaps of the paper.

  2. 2

    Fold the paper in half widthways. Draw a swooped design leading from the top left edge to about two-thirds down to the bottom of the paper with the fold on the bottom. Swoop the line back up again to about half way up the paper. Cut the paper along the line.

  3. 3

    Fold the smaller ends of the plane outward to form wings. Use about a 45 degree angle when folding. Curl the edge of the larger wings in toward the middle crease.

  4. 4

    Open the aeroplane. Bend the top corner edge in slightly toward the back of the plane to form the plane's nose. Fly the aeroplane with the larger wings in front and the smaller wings in back. Adjust the curl and bend of the wings until it flies evenly and to a great distance. If the wings are stabilised enough, the plane should be able to fly 20 feet or farther.

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