How to heal the skin after scarlet fever

Written by c.k. wren
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How to heal the skin after scarlet fever
Rashes caused by scarlet fever will itch and peel as the body heals. (Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images)

Scarlet fever, which is most commonly seen in children between the ages of four and eight, is a bacterial infection caused by the Group A Streptococcus bacteria. These infectious germs are carried in the nose and mouth and are very contagious. While this particular illness used to cause fatal epidemics, it can now be easily treated with antibiotics. Scarlet fever is characterised by a sore throat followed by a bright red rash on the body, giving it its distinctive name. A rash from scarlet fever will peel as it heals and can take some time to resolve even after the patient is no longer contagious. There are some steps you can take to help the skin heal more quickly and comfortably.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Loose cotton clothing
  • Fingernail clippers
  • Calamine lotion

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wear loose, cool and comfortable cotton clothing to keep from irritating sensitive skin. Keep away from anything that fits too tightly or chafes the skin.

  2. 2

    Trim your fingernails low to help avoid the temptation to scratch any areas of the rash, either while awake or unconsciously. Scratching inflamed skin might feel better for a moment, but it will ultimately delay the healing process. The more you can leave your skin alone, the faster and better it will heal.

  3. 3

    Apply calamine lotion as needed to any particularly itchy areas. A cool, wet cloth or a cool bath may help soothe large areas of affected skin.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not use any topical product on your skin during the healing process without the permission of your doctor.

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