How to write a volunteer letter of demotion to your employer

Written by ireland wolfe
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How to write a volunteer letter of demotion to your employer
Some companies will work with you if you ask for a voluntary demotion. (Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images)

There are some situations in your career where you may to ask for a voluntary demotion. You may want to strike a better balance between work and family or you may need to reduce your workload to care for an ailing family member. Voluntary demotions will likely involve a salary cut but will also entail a cut in responsibility or work hours. It is important to show your ongoing commitment to your company when asking for a demotion.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Review your company policy before asking for a voluntary demotion. Some companies have explicit policies and procedures about employee demotion.

  2. 2

    Write a letter in business format to your immediate supervisor. Type your address on the left hand side followed by the date. Address your letter to your supervisor with the company address.

  3. 3

    Open your letter by asking for a voluntary demotion at your company. Be clear and direct about your request.

  4. 4

    Explain in the next one to two paragraphs why you are requesting the demotion. Highlight the positive aspects of your career. If you are seeking a demotion because you don't like your job, frame the request as wanting to return to your old job. Stay positive.

  5. 5

    Close your letter with a summary. Include your contact information and thank your supervisor for her time in this matter. Sign your letter and make a copy for your records. You may also want to turn a copy into your Human Resources Department.

  6. 6

    Wait for an answer. Your company may choose to reject your demotion or have you apply for a different position. Be prepared to make your case in person to your supervisor.

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