How to Make an Owl Beak

Written by kim blakesley Google
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How to Make an Owl Beak
Draw or sculpt an owl's beak using a teardrop shape to begin. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Each bird has a beak unique to its species. The shape of the beak indicates what type of items the bird eats and, in some instances, what type of work the beak completes. An owl has a curved beak. The shape of the beak is like a teardrop: The top of the beak is wide with the bottom coming to a point. The side of the owl's beak shows that it is curved. The curve begins at the large top section, goes out and then comes back in at the bottom.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Clay

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Instructions

    How to Draw an Owl's Beak

  1. 1

    Place a piece of paper on a smooth, flat work surface. Draw the face of an owl. Position the eyes on the centre line of the face.

  2. 2

    Draw the beak in the shape of an upside down teardrop when drawing the owl face on.

  3. 3

    Draw a side view of an owl's beak using two different size teardrop shapes. Draw a large upside down teardrop for the front portion of the owl's beak. Tilt the point slightly toward the face. Draw a small, skinny, upside-down teardrop for the back portion of the owl's beak. Tilt the point slightly toward the front beak.The front portion of an owl's beak is larger than the back. The length of both parts is the same.

    Sculpting an Owl's Beak

  1. 1

    Roll a 1-inch ball of clay.

  2. 2

    Press the clay between your thumbs and forefingers to manipulate the ball into a teardrop shape.

  3. 3

    Curve the middle and tip of the teardrop to create the hook in the owl's beak.

  4. 4

    Repeat Steps 1 through 3 with a 3/4-inch ball of clay. Make the teardrop shape the same length as the 1-inch ball of clay. The teardrop will be smaller on top. Curve in the same fashion.

  5. 5

    Connect the two teardrops on their fat ends to create the owl's beak. Make sure the curved tips are facing one another.

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