How to Not Get Cuts on the Back of Your Heel While Wearing Slip Ons

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How to Not Get Cuts on the Back of Your Heel While Wearing Slip Ons
Test your shoes for comfort before buying them. (Jupiterimages/Creatas/Getty Images)

Slip Ons are shoes that do not have laces and that you may simply step into. They are comfortable shoes to wear, especially in the summer, and they are quick to put on and take off. One drawback that Slip Ons have is that the edge of the shoe may cut into your heel or Achilles tendon. Even if a cut does not occur, the aggravation may cause the skin there to abrade and blister. Avoid unsightly cuts and pain can be largely prevented by taking a few precautions.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Ointment
  • Adhesive bandages
  • Heel padding

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Exchange the shoes for a different size. If the Slip Ons are too large for you or your foot slides around in them go for a smaller size. Cuts on your heels signify that you may need a smaller size, as slippage causes abrasions.

  2. 2

    Apply a small amount of ointment to the wound and fix an adhesive bandage over it. This protects your foot from the cutting edge of the Slip On and provides some relief as you heal. It will also allow you skin to toughen before the next time you wear the shoes.

  3. 3

    Place heel padding into the slip-ons. Heel padding is available in the form of stick on foam piece that only covers the heel portion of your shoe. The slight padding helps the shoe fit more securely around your foot. It also prevents the shoe from rubbing on the skin as much as it would otherwise.

Tips and warnings

  • Put on shoes and walk around with them on before buying them. There is some variation between sizes, so try the same shoe in several different sizes before making your purchase. This ensures a better fit.

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