How to Tell the Gender of a Baby by the Belly Shape

Written by michelle johnson
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How to Tell the Gender of a Baby by the Belly Shape
Some people believe a rounded belly means a girl is on the way. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

As soon as the second line materialises on a home pregnancy test, parents start wondering one thing: Am I having a boy or a girl? Unfortunately, the wait from a positive pregnancy test until a baby has developed enough for an ultrasound to reveal the gender can be a very long one. In the mean time, many old wives' tales claim that curious parents can guess their baby's gender by paying attention to food cravings, the baby's heart rate -- or even the shape of Mom's belly.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Look at how high a woman carries her baby. If she is carrying high, it indicates a girl, but if she is carrying low, that suggests a boy.

  2. 2

    Check out the size of a pregnant woman's belly. A larger belly means she's having a girl. A smaller, less noticeable belly indicates a boy.

  3. 3

    Examine the shape of a pregnant woman's bump. A round, basketball-shaped bump with extra weight around a woman's hips and bottoms suggests she's carrying a girl. A narrow bump that sticks straight out means she's having a boy.

Tips and warnings

  • Don't put too much faith in old wives' tale. Belly shape during pregnancy has more to do with a woman's stomach muscles and a baby's position than gender. A woman pregnant for the first time may carry high because she has strong stomach muscles, while another woman may carry lower because her baby has dropped in preparation for delivery. A wide belly may mean a baby is lying sideways, and a bump that sticks straight out may just indicate a woman has a short torso and straight out is the only place the baby can go.

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