How to Long Treble Crochet

Written by ann jones
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How to Long Treble Crochet
Long treble crochet creates tall, open stitches. (Ben Bloom/Digital Vision/Getty Images)

The long treble crochet, also called the triple treble, is an extra-tall crochet stitch often found in vintage patterns. This stitch works up quickly due to its height, making it ideal for whipping up scarves and other openwork patterns. The fabric made using a long treble crochet stitch will not be as tight as that made with single or double crochet stitches. You will see long treble crochet abbreviated in crochet patterns as LTC.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

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Things you need

  • Yarn
  • Crochet hook

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Begin with one loop on your crochet hook. This will either be the loop left over after creating the previous crochet stitch or the last loop in a chain.

  2. 2

    Wrap the working yarn around your hook three times in a counterclockwise direction, or from right to left. You will now have four loops on your hook.

  3. 3

    Insert the hook into the next stitch in your current row of crochet stitches.

  4. 4

    Wrap the yarn counterclockwise around the hook one more time and draw this loop through the stitch. You will now have five stitches on your hook.

  5. 5

    Wrap the hook counterclockwise again and pull this loop through the first two stitches on your hook. Continue wrapping once and pulling through two stitches at a time until only one stitch remains on your hook. You are then ready to start the next long treble crochet stitch.

Tips and warnings

  • To start a long treble crochet stitch off of an initial crochet chain, insert your hook into the fourth stitch from the end of the chain. This gives the beginning of the row the necessary height.

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