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How to Install a Cradle Banjo Strap

Updated April 17, 2017

Cradle straps are specifically designed for the banjo. Installing one only takes a couple of minutes. A cradle strap wraps all the way around the rim of the banjo. This helps to distribute the weight of the banjo evenly and keep it balanced once the strap is placed on your shoulder.

Separate the parts of the strap. The tail section of the strap wraps around the rim of the banjo and connects to the main body of the strap, which is attached to the banjo near the heel of the neck. The two parts of the cradle strap are connected to each other with screws, metal rings or tie-strings. Disconnect the two parts of the strap.

Lay the banjo on a table or flat surface. Thread the tailpiece section of the strap behind the tailpiece and tension hooks of the banjo rim. Continue threading the strap under all the hooks until you reach the heel of the banjo neck. Some cradle straps have two tailpiece sections rather than one. Thread the two pieces in opposite directions starting at the tailpiece of the banjo so that they meet at the heel of the banjo neck.

Attach the main body of the strap to a tension hook near the heel of the neck on the rim of the banjo. The method for attaching the strap depends upon the type of cradle strap you are using. The main body of some cradle straps is tied or clamped to a tension hook near the heel of the neck. The main body of other cradle straps attaches directly to the tailpiece section.

Line up the holes of the tail section with the holes in the main body of the strap. Reattach the screws, rings or string to connect the two sections of the strap.

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About the Author

Robert Russell began writing online professionally in 2010. He holds a Ph.D. in philosophy and is currently working on a book project exploring the relationship between art, entertainment and culture. He is the guitar player for the nationally touring cajun/zydeco band Creole Stomp. Russell travels with his laptop and writes many of his articles on the road between gigs.