How to Write a Proof of Income Letter

Written by louise balle
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Proof of income is required in a number of everyday situations, such as applying for a loan or even getting approved for membership in certain organisations. If you have to provide proof of income for one of your employees, ensure that you include all required details that the other party may need to know to verify this information.

Skill level:
Easy

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Place the current date at the top of the letter along with a greeting to the name of the contact who needs this information. If you do not know the name, or the employee just needs a general verification letter, just write "Dear Sir or Madam" or "To Whom It May Concern."

  2. 2

    Identify yourself as the employer and list the name of your firm. Identify the employee by his full name, title, position and employee number. Enter the date he started working at the firm as well as the department where he works.

  3. 3

    Confirm if the employee is part time, full time or seasonal.

  4. 4

    List the employee's gross hourly or yearly income as requested by the other party for the year or period in question. Provide a summary of the employee's earnings up to the current date for the current year as well.

  5. 5

    Write a line confirming that the individual is a worker in good standing whose chance of continuing employment at the firm is solid if true.

  6. 6

    Provide your company's phone number, e-mail and Web address so that the other party can confirm its existence and contact you for any further questions or concerns. Close the letter with your full name, department and position (such as supervising manager or owner).

  7. 7

    Print the proof of income letter on your company letterhead and sign before providing it to the employee. Keep a copy of the letter in his employee file.

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