How to Paint Plastisol

Written by ryan lawrence
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Plastisol is composed of polyvinyl chloride particles suspended in a plasticising emulsion. This material requires high heat to solidify and is used to make everything from fishing lures, food replicas, toys and as surface coatings for metallic items, such as steering wheels. Most every type of paint will ultimately crack and flake off this flexible material. For a long-lasting finish that will adequately bond, choose a special type of paint specifically formulated for flexible vinyl surfaces.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Water-based degreasing soap
  • Rags
  • Towels
  • 300-grit sandpaper
  • Canvas dust sheets
  • Masking paper
  • Low-tack painter's masking tape
  • Flexible vinyl spray paint

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wash the plastisol with a degreasing soap, or unseen hand oils and dust particles may keep the paint from sticking.

  2. 2

    Rinse the plastisol, using wet rags. Leave no degreasing residues behind, or adhesion difficulties will prove likely. Dry the plastisol with a towel.

  3. 3

    Lightly sand the plastisol with a very fine, 300-grit sandpaper. Stop once the plastisol feels slightly rough.

  4. 4

    Position canvas dust sheets under the plastisol; apply painter's tape and masking paper to surfaces adjacent to the plastisol.

  5. 5

    Coat the plastisol with two very fine layers of flexible vinyl spray paint. Ensure a professional-looking finish that won't clump or clot by maintaining 8 inches between the plastisol and spray tip. Wait four hours between each coat. Lightly sand the first coat to promote adhesion.

Tips and warnings

  • Don't use ordinary latex, acrylic or oil based paint on plastisol, or cracking, fading and flaking will prove likely.
  • Though it may seem tedious and unnecessary, the cleaning process is critical to encouraging adequate adhesion. Do not undervalue this process, or the plastisol may ultimately reject the flexible vinyl spray paint.

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