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How to Type Numbers With the Square Root Symbol Using Microsoft Word

Updated June 13, 2017

To write numbers in a square root in Microsoft Word, you have two options. You can use Word's Equation tools to create advanced mathematical expressions, such as a number inside a square root symbol, also known as a radical. When you use this option, the top line of the square root extends over the entire number you type inside the symbol. Alternatively, you can use the Symbol menu to insert a smaller square root symbol, and the number you type will simply follow that symbol.

Click in the text where you want to insert the square root symbol.

Click the "Insert" tab on the Ribbon.

Click the lower part of the "Equation" icon on the Ribbon -- the part that says "Equation" and shows a downward arrow, not the part showing a pi symbol. This opens a drop-down menu. Click "Insert New Equation," near the bottom of the menu.

Word will switch to the "Design: Equation Tools" tab.

Click the button labelled "Radical" on the Ribbon. This opens a drop-down menu. Click one of the options to insert the square root symbol. To insert a simple square root, click the top left option.

Click the dotted box inside the square root.

Type the number that you want to appear inside the square root.

Click anywhere else on the page, in the normal text, to deselect the equation. It will now appear as normal text.

Click in the text where you want to insert the square root symbol.

Click the "Insert" tab on the Ribbon.

Click the "Symbol" icon on the Ribbon; on the drop-down menu, click "More Symbols." This activates the Symbol menu.

Scroll down until you see the square root symbol, then click it. Or type "214" into the "Character code" field, near the bottom of the menu.

Click "Insert," then click "Close."

Type the number that you want to appear with the square root.

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About the Author

As a professional copywriter since 2004, Lily Medina researches to expand her expertise in technology, parenting, education, health, fitness and writing. She has also taught high school and worked as a copy editor. Medina majored in political theory at Patrick Henry College.