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How to Fix a Scratched Watch Bezel

It can be disheartening to scratch the face of a favourite watch. Although everyday wear and tear is inevitable, a scratched watch face does not necessarily require replacement. Deep scratches (ones you can stick a nail in) or chips are beyond the reach of home repairs, most small scratches and scuffs can be easily removed. Small scratches can be buffed out using a number of soft abrasive compounds and a little elbow grease, leaving your watch as looking as good as new.

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Apply a small amount of toothpaste to your watch bezel. Use an abrasive toothpaste if you can. If you would prefer to use watch products, there are several creams which are manufactured specifically for this purpose and can be obtained from a jeweller. Brass cleaning products are also effective in removing minor scratches. They are applied in the same manner.

Rub the tooth paste or polish gently in a circular motion. Periodically check bezel to see if the scratch has been removed.

Wipe the bezel with a clean damp cloth to remove the toothpaste or other product you may have used.

Buff the bezel with a dry, soft cloth until it is sparkling and clean.

Mix the jeweller's rouge powder with a enough water to make a paste. Mix enough to make a pea sized amount of paste.

Apply the paste to the watch bezel with a cotton swab. Rub in a circular motion, applying slight pressure as you do so.

Allow the rouge to dry. Wipe with a clean, dry cloth to remove the jeweller's rouge.

Buff the surface of the bezel with a soft cloth until it is clean and shiny.

Tip

Buy jewellers rouge online, from a jewellery supply store or from a hobby shop. Do not use abrasive kitchen cleaners or roughly textured cloths or you may make the scratches worse.

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Things You'll Need

  • Soft cloth
  • Toothpaste, brass or watch polish
  • Jeweller's rouge powder
  • Water
  • Small bowl
  • Cotton swab

About the Author

Nicole Fotheringham has been a writer since 1997. She was born in South Africa and began as a reporter for the "Natal Mercury" and "Cape Argus" newspapers. Fotheringham has a master's degree in English literature from the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

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