DISCOVER
×

How to stop hot sweats

Updated February 21, 2017

Hot sweats, more commonly known as hot flushes, are an unfortunate reality for women going through menopause. It's estimated the Mayo Clinic that about three in four women experience hot flushes during menopause. Although the precise cause of hot sweats is unknown, the signs are familiar -- a sudden onrush of body heat, sweating, flushed face, rapid heart beat and head pressure. There are steps you can take to reduce the discomfort of hot flushes, as well as avoid triggers that cause hot flushes. If you're disposed to hot sweats, however, it may not be possible to completely avoid them.

Dress in light layered clothing. This will allow you to remove layers when a hot flush occurs, lessen the discomfort you experience and possibly shortening the length of a hot flush by cooling your body. Wear breathable layers, such as cotton or linen, that will not trap the heat from your body. Avoid synthetic materials, such as polyester, that trap your body heat.

Avoid food and beverage triggers, including spicy food, alcohol and caffeine. All of these items increase the odds that you will experience hot sweats.

Do not smoke. Smoking increases the occurrence of hot sweats.

Relax and take steps to lessen the stress in your life. Practise deep breathing, yoga or meditation. These activities relax the body and mind and can help you to de-stress. Do these activities daily and also at the onset of hot sweat symptoms to reduce the impact.

Remove or reduce stressful situations at home or at work. In addition to relaxation exercises, do light workouts or engage in a hobby.

Keep your environment cool. Lower the thermostat, draw the shades and remain out of the sun.

Tip

Talk with your doctor before taking a medical or herbal remedy to stop hot flushes. Some vitamins or medicines can interfere with the performance of other drugs you may be taking. Be sceptical of products that claim to stop or prevent hot flushes.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Tallulah Philange has worked as a journalist since 2003. Her work has appeared in the "Princeton (N.J.) Packet," "Destinations" magazine and in higher education publications. She also has edited and produced online content for those publications. Philange holds a Bachelor of Arts in print journalism from American University and a Master of Arts in communication, culture and technology from Georgetown University.