How to Get Kids to Drink Pedialyte

Written by kristle jones
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
How to Get Kids to Drink Pedialyte
A Popsicle may be more appealing than Pedialyte in its raw form. (Dynamic Graphics/Creatas/Getty Images)

Pedialyte is a specialised rehydration solution with electrolytes. The drinkable solution is designed to replace the fluids and minerals that are lost when kids are sick with diarrhoea or vomiting. Pedialyte is often recommended over sugary sodas, juice or sports drinks because it is designed with the appropriate amount of sugars and electrolytes needed by dehydrated kids. Although Pedialyte is an ideal drink for dehydrated kids, children may not always want to drink it on their own. Make it more appealing by disguising it as another food or treat to help children get what they need to feel better.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

Other People Are Reading

Things you need

  • Pedialyte
  • Popsicle moulds
  • Medicine dropper

Show MoreHide

Instructions

  1. 1

    Make Pedialyte Popsicles. A child who is dehydrated and does not want to drink Pedialyte on its own may enjoy a Pedialyte Popsicle instead. To make them, simply use a Popsicle mould and pour in Pedialyte and freeze. Allow kids to suck on the Popsicles, which may help with overheating from a fever as well.

  2. 2

    Use flavourless Pedialyte. There is a form of Pedialyte sold that is flavourless and can be added to anything. You can add the Pedialyte into a young baby's bottle so that he can get the electrolytes he needs without drinking any additional liquids.

  3. 3

    Use a medicine syringe or dropper. A medicine syringe or dropper can be extremely helpful for kids who refuse to drink Pedialyte. Administer the liquid into the mouth of the child by the dropperful.

Tips and warnings

  • Before giving Pedialyte to a child under 1 year of age, consult with your doctor.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.