How to make an eye splice in steel cable

Written by don davis
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How to make an eye splice in steel cable
Eye splices are typically used in ropes and cables aboard ship. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

Eye splices are typically used in rigging ships and boats. They are called eye splices because they result in a loop that looks like a teardrop or an eye. There are probably a half dozen variations, but the two most commonly used with steel cables are called the Liverpool eye splice and the Flemish eye splice, or Molly Hogan. Molly Hogans are simple to form, require few tools and are about 90 per cent as strong as the breaking strength of the cable. Use a cable with an even number of strands.

Skill level:
Moderately Easy

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Things you need

  • Chisel (optional)
  • Gloves
  • Wire clip
  • Open end wrench

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Unlay the cable strands using a chisel or only your gloved hands until the strands are 3 to 4 inches longer than the circumference of the eye you intend to tie.

  2. 2

    Divide the strands into two bunches with an equal number of strands, such as four and four or three and three, in each. Lay the core in one of the two bunches flat when splicing wire rope.

  3. 3

    Tie the two bunches into a simple overhand knot, like tying your shoes, at the top of the eye. Adjust the eye to the desired size.

  4. 4

    Bend sections of the two bunches of strands through the eye and twist so the strands re-lay into position. Continue until the eye is completed.

  5. 5

    Secure the "bitter," or loose, ends of the splice with a wire clip. A wire clip comprises a U-shaped bolt with threads on both ends, a frame with holes for the bolt ends and two nuts that pull the U-shaped bolt through the frame and tighten the clip on the cable.

  6. 6

    Tighten the bolts on the wire clip with an open end wrench.

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