DISCOVER
×

How to Make All of the Columns the Same Size in Microsoft Excel

Updated April 17, 2017

If the information in each of your columns is more or less of the same length, you can choose to make every column the same width. Evenly-sized columns may look better than unevenly-sized columns, especially when you print your spreadsheet. Resize the columns using the mouse if you want to size the columns by eye and do not need precise measurements. Resize the columns using the menu if you want columns to have a specific width.

Open the Excel worksheet with data in columns.

Hover your cursor over the letter of the first column you wish to select. When the black down arrow appears, click and drag across to the last column you want to select.

Hover on the line between any two selected column letters--it doesn't matter which two--until you see a black symbol with two arrows pointing in opposite directions. Click and drag left to make the columns narrower or drag right to make them wider. All the selected columns should now be of equal width.

Open the Excel worksheet with data in columns.

Hover your cursor over the letter of the first column you wish to select. When the black down arrow appears, click and drag across to the last column you want to select.

Click the "Home" tab, then click "Format" in the Cells section.

Select "Column Width" from the menu.

Enter a number in the box provided and click "OK." You can specify any number between 0 and 255; this represents the number of characters the column will display.

Warning

If you enter "0" for column width, your column will be hidden.

Cite this Article A tool to create a citation to reference this article Cite this Article

About the Author

Danielle Cort has been a freelance writer since 2008, specializing in psychology, health, education and parenting. She has published articles in "Family" magazine. Before becoming a freelance writer, Cort worked in the public policy research sector, conducting research, creating surveys and budgets. She holds a Doctor of Philosophy in social psychology from the University of Massachusetts.