How to design a memorial garden for a loved one

Written by shara jj cooper Google
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How to design a memorial garden for a loved one
White lilies are a symbol of peace. (Jupiterimages/Photos.com/Getty Images)

A memorial garden is a place where people can go to remember their loved ones. The garden can be a large sanctuary or a small corner as long as it represents the memory of the deceased. Memorial gardens can be built in a backyard or organised as part of a larger garden. Choose perennial plants that are easy to care for so more time can be spent enjoying the garden.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Statue
  • Flowers
  • Bench

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Select an area for the memorial. A small corner of the yard or a full backyard will work as a memorial garden. Use existing evergreens as a border or create one with new shrubs and hedges. Boxwood and spreading yew are easy to grow and groom and grow in a variety of conditions.

  2. 2

    Choose a focal point for the garden. Statues, fountains or a tree make good focal points. The focal point should be something that had a special meaning for the deceased or that symbolises feelings shared.

  3. 3

    Surround the focal point with flowers and plants that the deceased enjoyed. Favourite flowers or flowers that make a statement, such as white roses representing peace, are good additions. Most white flowers represent peace, purity and innocence. Many types of white flowers are available, such as lilies, hydrangeas, daisies, tulips, orchids and carnations.

  4. 4

    Add a bench or chair where people can sit, reflect and remember the deceased. Solid, outdoor furniture works well because it stands up to the weather and is not easily stolen.

Tips and warnings

  • Choose plants that thrive in the local growing climate.

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