How to Replace a Callaway Ferrule and Shaft

Written by izzy barden
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All Callaway golf clubs, including drivers, fairway woods, hybrids, irons and wedges, come in one of two styles -- hosel or bore-through. The process for replacing the ferrule and shaft for either style is relatively similar; however, bore-through heads require a few extra steps and a certain level of expertise. Always determine the style of your particular Callaway clubs before attempting to reshaft them. Hosel clubs have a small metal joint liniking the shaft and head together, while bore-through models simply have a cavity that goes straight through, clear to the bottom of the club head.

Skill level:
Moderately Challenging

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Things you need

  • Gloves
  • Heating gun
  • Epoxy
  • Replacement shaft
  • Replacement ferrule
  • Sandpaper
  • Masking tape
  • Hacksaw
  • Marker
  • Shaft plug

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Instructions

    Hosel Heads

  1. 1

    Place the protective gloves on both your hands and do not remove them until the process is complete.

  2. 2

    Use your heating gun to dispense heat evenly around the small metal joint linking the shaft to the club head -- this is the hosel. Do not panic if small amounts of white smoke begin to form; this is just the old epoxy melting

  3. 3

    Pull the club head straight off the shaft (never the other way around) and remember not to twist if you can help it. Twisting can cause damage to the shaft, especially a graphite shaft, and can render them useless for future clubs.

  4. 4

    Allow the hosel to cool completely and then, using a small piece of rolled-up sandpaper, clean away any remaining epoxy residue on its inner walls.

  5. 5

    Slide the replacement ferrule (small metal or rubber ring that strengthens the bond between the shaft and head) over the tip of the shaft.

  6. 6

    Drip epoxy into the hosel and fit it over the tip of the new shaft. Always place the head onto the shaft and not the other way around. Again, do not twist the head or the durable integrity of the shaft can be damaged.

  7. 7

    Remove your gloves and allow the club to set for at least 24 hours before using.

    Bore-Thru Heads

  1. 1

    Put on your protective gloves and use your heating gun to dispense heat into the shaft cavity of the club head. You will want to heat both the top and the bottom evenly.

  2. 2

    Pull the head off the shaft without twisting and set it aside so it can cool.

  3. 3

    Shove the shaft plug into the tip of the new shaft and wrap the entire tip with masking tape. Draw an angled line on the tape to portray the appropriate angle it will need to be once inserted into the head. Use the tip of the old shaft to determine the proper angle of the new shaft.

  4. 4

    Saw along the line draw on the tape with your hacksaw in smooth and confident thrusts. It is often easier, when cutting such a small area, to only saw forward and reset in between thrusts, instead of sawing in a back-and-forth pattern.

  5. 5

    Remove the tape and use sandpaper to smooth out the edges of the new shaft and to clean the shaft cavity in the club head once it is completely cool.

  6. 6

    Slide the ferrule over the tip of the new shaft.

  7. 7

    Drip epoxy into the shaft cavity of the club head and slide the head onto the tip of the replacement shaft. Press the club head down, until the tip of the shaft is matching the angle of the club head base perfectly.

  8. 8

    Remove your gloves and allow the club to set for at least 24 hours before using.

Tips and warnings

  • After reshafting a bore-through head, it can look a little rough at the sole of the club head. To give it a professional look, consider using a polishing buffer, and give the whole club head a shiny finish. Also, you can use any strong, metal-grade epoxy for this procedure, but specific golf shaft epoxy is available at most club fitting and golf outlet stores.
  • This is a dangerous procedure and can cause you bodily injury as well as ruin your club if done incorrectly. Always consult a professional to ensure that the job is done right and no harm comes to you or your club.

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