How to write a letter to ask for a raise in pay

Written by kelly shetsky
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How to write a letter to ask for a raise in pay
Ask the boss for a raise with tact and confidence. (Ryan McVay/Photodisc/Getty Images)

Negotiating for a pay raise can be intimidating and difficult.There are many ways to make the request, one of which is in writing. Writing a letter to ask for a raise in pay gives you the chance to think out all the reasons you deserve the pay raise. It also gives you the opportunity to ask for the money in an eloquent way, as opposed to demanding more money.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Know the relative market rates for your position. Having the knowledge will give you an objective view on your worth.

  2. 2

    Make the salary request at the appropriate time. If your company typically performs employee evaluations every year, do not ask for a pay raise after only being there for six months.

  3. 3

    Address the letter to your immediate supervisor. Start off by stating what you have enjoyed about working at the company. Remind the boss how many years you have worked there.

  4. 4

    Briefly list the achievements you have accomplished while at the company in a persuasive and confident tone. Think specifically of any achievements that have made the company money or attracted new clients.

  5. 5

    Ask for a one-on-one meeting to discuss your salary. Tactfully tell the boss you want to discuss your career development and eagerness to advance within the company.

  6. 6

    Mention that you also want to discuss the possibility of a pay increase to go along with your new role. Tell the boss you can meet with him at his earliest convenience.

  7. 7

    Avoid making threats to leave the company if your request is not granted. Wait six months to ask for another raise if you are not successful the first time.

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